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Ray Crim Receives GPCA’s Pioneer Award

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The award recognizes an individual who has been dedicated to growing the Georgia Pest Control Association and raising the industry's professionalism. Crim (pictured with award) is senior executive vice president with Arrow Exterminators.

| August 3, 2010

Arrow celebrates with  Ray Crim. From left to right: Danny Nix, Tim Pollard, Rick Bell, Kevin Malone, Ray Crim, Nancy Delany, Richard Spencer, Shay Runion, Brantley Russell

ATLANTA – Ray Crim, senior executive vice president with Arrow Exterminators, recently received the Pioneer Award from the Georgia Pest Control Association. The Pioneer Award is selected by the outgoing president and chooses a person who has dedicated themselves to growing the Georgia Pest Control Association and the professionalism of our industry. 

Previous recipients have included: Red Tindol,  Cal Stephenson, Sr., Bob Russell, Bill Blasingame, Jimmy Allgood, Dr. Brian Forschler, Tom Diederich, Rick Bell, Steve Arnold, Bubba Tindol, Paul Hardy and others. 
 
GPCA started this award in 1990, making Crim’s award the 20th anniversary recognition.

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