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Tick Bites Make Some People Allergic to Red Meat

Public Health

Researchers say that bites from the voracious lone star tick are making some people allergic to red meat — even if they've never had a problem eating it before, the Wall Street Journal reports.

| June 11, 2013

Researchers say that bites from the voracious lone star tick are making some people allergic to red meat — even if they've never had a problem eating it before, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The allergic reactions range from vomiting and abdominal cramps to hives to anaphylaxis, which can lead to breathing difficulties and sometimes even death.

Unlike most food allergies, the symptoms typically set in three to six hours after an affected person eats beef, pork or lamb—often in the middle of the night.

The bite that seems to precipitate it may occur weeks or months before, often making it difficult for people to make the link.

Source: Wall Street Journal



 

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