Secret Site Map
Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Home News Common Crop Pesticides Kill Honeybee Larvae in the Hive

Common Crop Pesticides Kill Honeybee Larvae in the Hive

Stinging Insects

Four pesticides commonly used on crops to kill insects and fungi also kill honeybee larvae within their hives, according to Penn State and University of Florida researchers.

| January 28, 2014

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Four pesticides commonly used on crops to kill insects and fungi also kill honeybee larvae within their hives, according to Penn State and University of Florida researchers. The team also found that N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) -- an inert, or inactive, chemical commonly used as a pesticide additive -- is highly toxic to honeybee larvae.

"We found that four of the pesticides most commonly found in beehives kill bee larvae," said Jim Frazier, professor of entomology, Penn State. "We also found that the negative effects of these pesticides are sometimes greater when the pesticides occur in combinations within the hive. Since pesticide safety is judged almost entirely on adult honeybee sensitivity to individual pesticides and also does not consider mixtures of pesticides, the risk assessment process that the Environmental Protection Agency uses should be changed."

According to Frazier, the team's previous research demonstrated that forager bees bring back to the hive an average of six different pesticides on the pollen they collect. Nurse bees use this pollen to make beebread, which they then feed to honeybee larvae.

To examine the effects of four common pesticides -- fluvalinate, coumaphos, chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos -- on bee larvae, the researchers reared honeybee larvae in their laboratory. They then applied the pesticides alone and in all combinations to the beebread to determine whether these insecticides and fungicides act alone or in concert to create a toxic environment for honeybee growth and development.

The researchers also investigated the effects of NMP on honeybee larvae by adding seven concentrations of the chemical to a pollen-derived, royal jelly diet.

Click here
to read the entire article.

Source: Penn State News

Top news

Suspect Arrested in Death of Jill Su

Police have arrested Dayont'e Omar Resiles in connection with the death of Su, wife of renowned UF Entomologist Nan-Yao Su, Local 10 News reported.

Agri-Turf Distributing Names Lon Records CEO

Records is a familiar face in the industry with a career that dates back to the early 1970s.

Rodent Deterrent Believed to Have Sparked Wildfire

The four-day-old Silverado Fire, which has burned nearly 1,000 acres, was apparently ignited by the sun reflecting off metal sheeting put up by someone trying to keep rodents out of a vegetable garden, a fire official told ABC 10 San Diego.

Ed Szymanski Joins Nisus Corporation

Szymanski, a 36-year industry veteran, is area manager for the South Central and Mountain regions of the U.S.

Skyline Pest Solutions Makes Acquisition

Skyline has purchased the pest control division of Aabby Group.

x