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Wildlife Population Boom Creating Costly Mess

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An amazing resurgence of wildlife in America has created problems for homeowners, according to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal.

| November 12, 2012

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An amazing resurgence of wildlife in America has created problems for homeowners, according to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal.

According to the article, this year, Princeton, N.J., has hired sharpshooters to cull 250 deer from the town's herd of 550 over the winter. The cost: $58,700. Columbia, S.C., is spending $1 million to rid its drainage systems of beavers and their dams. The 2009 "miracle on the Hudson," when US Airways flight 1549 had to make an emergency landing after its engines ingested Canada geese, saved 155 passengers and crew, but the $60 million A320 Airbus was a complete loss. In the U.S., the total cost of wildlife damage to crops, landscaping and infrastructure now exceeds $28 billion a year ($1.5 billion from deer-vehicle crashes alone), according to Michael Conover of Utah State University, who monitors conflicts between people and wildlife.

Click here to read the entire article.

Source: onlinewsj.com

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