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QA Food Safety Bootcamp a Success

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In March, members of the Food Protection Alliance held their annual Internal QA Boot Camp at Kansas State University.

| March 22, 2013

Attendees at the QA Food Safety Boot Camp. Image courtesy of the Food Protection Alliance.

MANHATTAN, Kan. - In March, members of the Food Protection Alliance gathered together and held their annual Internal QA Boot Camp at the Kansas State International Grain Program Facility in Manhattan, Kan.

The training held a focus on Quality Assurance Food Safety Pest Management.  During the two days of training, one day was devoted to in class training and the other to a mock inspection at the Universities Flour Mill.  Speakers included AIB personnel, Food Defense, Pest Management Attorney, Food Safety Consultants/Auditors, and a University Professor.  This annual training allows the group to perform consistent quality service to their customers throughout North America.  

To learn more about, call 877/372-3334 or contact kschmitz@fpalliance.com

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