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American Pest Management's Aggson Earns ACE

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Travis Aggson, of the Manhattan, Kan.-based firm, is now an Associate Certified Entomologist.

| April 18, 2013

MANHATTAN, Kan. - American Pest Management announced that Travis Aggson has earned his Associate Certified Entomologist Credentials. 

To achieve Associate Certified Entomologist (ACE) status, a person must have a minimum of seven years of verifiable pest management experience, the knowledge and ability to pass a rigorous test on insect pest control, a current U.S. pesticide applicators license, and a willingness to adhere to the ACE Code of Ethics.
 
"We're very proud of the work Travis accomplished and the knowledge he gained in order to become a certified ACE," said Ravi Sachdeva, CEO, American Pest Management. "It means a lot to have nationally-recognized, certified experts as part of our company."
 
The ACE examination includes questions about basic entomology; insect identification, life cycles, and control measures; health impacts of pests; ecological principles pertaining to pest control; environmental impacts related to pest control; integrated pest management (IPM); pesticide safety and health issues; pesticide technology and resources; organizations and associations of significance to the pest control industry; and laws and regulations affecting the industry.

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