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Continuous Property Maintenance Code Additions Defeated

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NPMA helped prevent two proposals from being added to the Property Maintenance Code.

| May 17, 2013

FAIRFAX, Va. — During the week of April 21, the International Building Code meeting was held in Dallas, and as part of that meeting NPMA worked to prevent two proposals from being added to the Property Maintenance Code.

Both of the plans included language that NPMA’s WDO Division determined could be detrimental to the industry. Specifically, the National Center for Healthy Housing (NCHH) was attempting to define an infestation as the simple presence of pest debris/reside. In a second NCHH proposal, Code Officials would be allowed to regulate the storage and application of pesticides. With this second proposal's effects at the state level NPMA partnered with ASPCRO to defeat this proposal. The final results of NPMA’s actions were that the preemption has been preserved and infestation will not be defined by the simple presence of pest debris/residue.

 

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