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BASF to Host Rasberry Crazy Ant Seminar

Industry Events

A free seminar about the management of this pest will be held at the Hilton Houston Hobby Airport on June 24.

| June 3, 2010

ST. LOUIS, MO, June 3, 2010 – BASF Pest Control Solutions is conducting a free seminar for pest management professionals on Rasberry Crazy Ants and the important issues relating to this new pest. Presentations will cover research from Texas A&M University, information on the FIFRA Section 18 Quarantine Exemption Termidor SC termiticide/insecticide label, effective solutions for managing this pest from BASF experts and important insights from industry expert Tom Rasberry.

Seminar details:
Thursday, June 24, 2010
Hilton Houston Hobby Airport
8181 Airport Rd.
Houston, TX 77061
7:30 – 11:30am

Registration begins at 7:00 a.m. and a continental breakfast will be served. This seminar is free of charge, but space is limited. All attendees must register in advance through www.PestControl.basf.us or call 800-777-8570, ext 4276.

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