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Home News AP&G Introduces BDS System (Bedbug Detection System)

AP&G Introduces BDS System (Bedbug Detection System)

Supplier News

The product utilizes a patented adhesive dot matrix technology and physical design to capture specimens.

| September 27, 2010

BROOKLYN, N.Y. -  A new concept in bed bug detection from AP&G’s Catchmaster line now offers hotel, hospitality and residence-based industries an innovative, “passive” detection system designed specifically to monitor for bed bugs on a large scale as part of a proactive inspection/intervention strategy. Called BDS (Bedbug Detection System), the product utilizes a patented adhesive dot matrix technology and physical design to capture specimens.

“The growing scourge of bed bugs is a ticking time bomb,” said Jonathan Frisch, AP&G’s vice president, sales and marketing.  “According to the National Pest Management Association, 95 percent of pest management companies recently surveyed said they had encountered a bed bug infestation in the last year, compared to only 25 percent before 2000. As infestations increase throughout the hospitality industry, the potential losses in terms of reputation, confidence and litigation are incalculable. That’s why this new and effective system is needed in today’s marketplace.

“We were also driven to create the BDS device by pure economics,” Frisch added.  “Current bed bug monitors can range from $20 to $600. Considering these rates, it is hard to imagine a large-scale program being used in a 250-room hotel, or a 400-unit apartment complex.  What’s more, the affordability, discrete nature and flexibility of the BDS system allow it to be used almost anywhere, including multi-unit dwellings, hotels, hospitals, military posts, and more.”

When strategically placed throughout the target areas, BDS monitors act as both an interceptor trap, by creating an adhesive barrier when used around bedposts, and as a passive monitor, to provide early detection in sheltered locations, thus allowing chemical treatments to be limited to fewer areas.

In fact, the concept of early detection is supported independently by the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, which states that the use of bed bug monitoring devices should be part of an overall integrated pest management strategy.  Intervention is key to this process because it is most effective when populations are low, hence the value of effective monitoring.

For more information visit www.catchmaster.com.

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