Secret Site Map
Friday, November 28, 2014

Home News Bird-B-Gone’s Bird Jolt Flat Track System Features Patented Technology

Bird-B-Gone’s Bird Jolt Flat Track System Features Patented Technology

Bird Management Products

Bird Jolt Flat Track is a low profile electric track system that produces a mild electric jolt when birds land on its surface.

| November 18, 2011

Bird Jolt Receives Two New Patents
The United States Patent office has recently awarded two new patents to Bird-B-Gone on the Bird Jolt Flat Track bird deterrent system. The two new patents were awarded for the systems’ glue troughs; US 8015747 & US 8020340.

MISSION VIEJO, Calif. — The Bird Jolt Flat Track bird deterrent system features a patented anti-arcing and glue trough design that is safe and effective against all species of birds, according to manufacturer Bird-B-Gone.

The glue troughs along the base of the Bird Jolt system raise and insulate the threads that secure the conductors, preventing water from creating a conductive channel underneath the track by wicking up the threads and shorting out the track, a common problem among electrified track systems, according to manufacturer Bird-B-Gone. The glue troughs also provide better adhesion.

Bird Jolt’s low-profile design makes it well suited for use in areas where aesthetics are a concern. Available in four colors – grey, stone, black and terracotta – it comes in 100-foot rolls and can be installed easily on curved or straight surfaces. Measuring only ¼-inch at its highest point, the Bird Jolt system can be used in a wide variety of locations including ledges, rooflines, signs, I-beams, parapet walls and eaves.

To learn more about the Bird Jolt system or any of Bird-B-Gone’s products, visit www.birdbgone.com or call toll-free, 800/392-6915.


 

Top news

NPMA Announces Opening for Director of Regulatory Affairs Position

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) is seeking a qualified regulatory affairs professional to direct the day-to-day management and execution of NPMA’s federal and state regulatory affairs programs

Ehrlich Selected to Protect National Landmarks

The company has been selected by the National Park Service to install and maintain effective termite control systems for 14 national historic sites in the Delaware Valley, including Independence Hall.

NC State: Warmer Temps Limit Impact of Parasites, Boost Pest Populations

Research from North Carolina State University shows that some insect pests are thriving in warm, urban environments and developing earlier, limiting the impact of parasitoid wasps that normally help keep those pest populations in check.

Fruit Flies Learn From Others, Researchers Say

When female fruit flies have to decide where to lay their eggs, they take their lead from what they see most others in their group do, new research shows.

May Berenbaum Receives New Species of Cockroach Named After Her

During Entomology 2014, ESA’s annual meeting in Portland, Ore., Dr. Berenbaum was presented with specimens of a new cockroach named after her.

x