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Home News Bluestone Lighting Offers Professional LED Flashlight

Bluestone Lighting Offers Professional LED Flashlight

Inspections

The 957 LED Pro Light is a fully rechargeable flashlight with a 1000 lumen output.

| March 30, 2010

Bluestone Lighting has introduced the 957 LED Pro Light, a fully rechargeable LED flashlight with a 1000 lumen output.  The flashlight comes housed in a sturdy aluminum, water-resistant case with an anti-slip grip design.

This extreme high brightness LED light uses low energy consumption, providing runtimes of up to 1 hour on low and 3.5 hours on high. The 957 also features easy twist ring control for high/low modes and 4x Spot or 1x Flood operation, allowing output to be easily regulated to handle all kinds of mission situations. 

The Bluestone 957 features 7 K2 Luxeon white LEDs and comes complete with two rechargeable battery barrels and chargers in a rugged custom storage case. In-car and AC chargers are also included. The battery measures 3 ¾ inches x 9 ½ inches and weighs 3.87 pounds with the battery.

For more information visit www.bluestonelighting.com.

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