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Home News Brownyard Group Adds Animal Mortality Coverage to PCOpro Program

Brownyard Group Adds Animal Mortality Coverage to PCOpro Program

Supplier News

Coverage is offered to pest control operators for canines that are specifically trained to detect insects or vermin.

| July 22, 2010

BAY SHORE, N.Y. — Brownyard Group, a program administrator providing specialized insurance coverage for select industry groups, announced that it has added Animal Mortality coverage to its PCOpro national pest control program.

Coverage is offered to pest control operators for canines that are specifically trained to detect insects or vermin with a limit of up to $15,000 per dog (subject to policy conditions regarding fair market value). To be eligible, dogs must be age 7 or under, currently active in insect or vermin detection services, specifically trained for insect or vermin detection, and licensed if required by State or Local Government.

“These dogs not only provide a valuable service to pest control professionals, but they are very expensive to have trained,” said John Culotta, PCOpro Program Manager. “This coverage will provide peace of mind to the owner, that should their dog suffer an unexpected death, they will be reimbursed for their investment.”

For more information visit www.brownyardgroup.com or e-mail rconnelly@brownyard.com.

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