Secret Site Map
Monday, May 04, 2015

Home News Cockroaches Injected With DNA Nanobots

Cockroaches Injected With DNA Nanobots

Cockroaches

Bioengineers have successfully injected them with nanorobots made from DNA that can unfold to dispense drugs, Discovery News reports.

| April 23, 2014

Bioengineers have successfully injected them with nanorobots made from DNA that can unfold to dispense drugs, Discovery News reports.

The nanoscale robots were made using DNA strands that fold and unfold like origami. They can function like mini-computers, carrying out simple tasks. One day similar nanorobots could be programmed to seek out diseases inside humans and treat them at the site, with medical precision.

The work is being led by Daniel Levner from Wyss Institute at Harvard University and scientists at Bar Ilan University in Israel. He and his colleagues programmed the DNA nanorobots to interact with each other and move around inside a living cockroach.

The programs were simple logical operations that directed the DNA to unfold and release a molecule, for example, when it encountered a specific protein.

Read the entire article.

Source: Discovery News

Top news

Arrow Exterminators Acquires Corpus Christi-Based Certified Termite and Pest Control

New location adds to Arrow’s footprint in the growing Texas market.

Copesan Elects New Officers on Board of Directors

Stacy O’Reilly, president, Plunkett’s Pest Control, succeeds Sprague Pest Solutions’ Alfie Treleven as chair of the Copesan board of directors.

Rollins Reports First Quarter 2015 Financial Results

Company posts 36th consecutive quarter of improved earnings.

NPMA Celebrates Academy's 20th Anniversary Vegas-Style

Sponsored by Dow AgroSciences, NPMA Academy is a unique opportunity designed to advance the professional and business development of the industry's leaders and emerging leaders in a hands-on, interactive environment, NPMA reports.

Bayer CropScience Celebrates One-Year Anniversary of North American Bee Care Center

State-of-the-art facility continuing to improve and protect honey bee health through research and development and education, Bayer says.

x