Secret Site Map
Wednesday, April 01, 2015

Home News Death Reignites EpiPens in Schools Debate

Death Reignites EpiPens in Schools Debate

Public Health

The death of a middle school boy who suffered an allergic reaction to fire ants during a football game has added fuel to the debate about whether schools should stock epinephrine, a potentially life-saving medication for severe allergy attacks, Today.com reports.

| September 19, 2013

The death of a middle school boy who suffered an allergic reaction to fire ants during a football game has added fuel to the debate about whether schools should stock epinephrine, a potentially life-saving medication for severe allergy attacks, Today.com reports.

Cameron Espinosa, 13, was huddling with teammates at Paul R. Haas Middle School in Corpus Christi last Wednesday when he started yelling, "Ants! Ants! Ants!," according to reports. After he collapsed, he was taken to Driscoll Children's Hospital where he died Sunday.

He died just one week after a bill was introduced to the U.S. Senate that would encourage states to require schools to stock epinephrine. The most well-known version of the medication is the EpiPen, a brand of the injectable form, which drives adrenaline into the person suffering an allergic attack.

The article noted that Death from anaphylaxis – a severe, whole-body reaction to an allergen – is rare, killing about 400 Americans each year, says Dr. Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, an allergist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Food is the most common trigger, but stings from insects – like the fire ants that swarmed Cameron on the middle school football field – cause about 500,000 emergency room visits each year, and about 40 deaths, according to the ACAAI.

Click here to read the entire article.

 

 

Top news

Pair of Destructive Termites Create New Hybrid Colonies

Two of the most destructive termite species in the world are now swarming simultaneously in South Florida, creating hybrid colonies that grow quickly and have the potential to migrate to other states.

Truly Nolen Promotes Scarlett Nolen

Scarlett Nolen, daughter of Truly Nolen, has been promoted to coaching and retention coordinator.

UF/IFAS Grad Student Wins Prize for Mosquito Trap Research

Casey Parker recently won the ONE WORLD competition, organized by the UF College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Challenge 2050 Project in conjunction with the Syngenta Good Growth Plan.

California Cities Top List of Terminix's 20 Most Termite-Ridden Cities

Terminix released its annual ranking of the most termite-infested cities in the country. Cities in California and Texas dominated the list, earning six of the top 10 spots.

Newly Published Book Explores History of Bed Bugs

Science journalist Brooke Borel has penned ‘Infested: How the Bed Bug Infiltrated Our Bedrooms and Took Over the World,’ a look at the biological and cultural histories of these amazingly adaptive insects.

x