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EPA Moves to Ban the Sale of Some Rodenticides to Residential Consumers

Rodents & Mice

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced on Tuesday it is moving to ban the sale of certain rodenticides to residential customers.

| June 9, 2011

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced on Tuesday it is moving to ban the sale of certain rodenticides to residential customers (read the entire EPA release). The agency is also requiring that all newly registered rodenticides marketed to residential consumers be enclosed in bait stations that render the pesticide inaccessible to children and pets. Wildlife that consume bait or poisoned rodents will also be protected by EPA’s actions, the agency says. 

“These changes are essential to reduce the thousands of accidental exposures of children that occur every year from rat and mouse control products and also to protect household pets,” said Steve Owens, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “Today’s action will help keep our children and pets safe from these poisons.”  

In 2008, EPA gave rodenticide manufacturers until June 4, 2011, to “research, develop and register new products that would be safer for children, pets and wildlife.” Over the past three years, EPA has worked with a number of companies to achieve that goal, and there are now new products on the market with new bait delivery systems and less toxic baits.

While many companies that produce rodenticides have agreed to adopt the new safety measures, a handful of companies have advised EPA that they do not plan to do so. Consequently, EPA intends to initiate cancellation proceedings under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, the federal pesticide law, against certain non-compliant products marketed by the following companies to remove them from the market:
• Reckitt Benckiser Inc. (makers of D-Con, Fleeject, and Mimas rodent control products)
• Woodstream Inc. (makers of Victor rodent control products)
• Spectrum Group (makers of Hot Shot rodent control products)
• Liphatech Inc. (makers of Generation, Maki, and Rozol rodent control products)

In addition to requiring more protective bait stations and prohibiting pellet formulations, EPA intends to ban the sale and distribution of rodenticide products containing brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difethialone and difenacoum directly to residential consumers because of their toxicity and the secondary poisoning hazards to wildlife. These rodenticides will still be available for use in residential settings, but only by professional pest control applicators. The compounds will also be allowed for use in agricultural settings; however, bait stations will be required for all outdoor, above-ground uses to minimize exposure to children, pets and wildlife.

More information on rodenticides  that meet EPA’s safety standard:  http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/mice-and-rats

 

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