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Kafka's ‘Metamorphosis’ Inspires a Google Doodle

Cockroaches

In recognition of author Franz Kafka’s birthday, today’s Google doodle is inspired by the author’s classic short story of a man transformed into a monstrous, yet indistinguishable vermin.

| July 3, 2013

In recognition of author Franz Kafka’s birthday, today’s Google doodle is inspired by the author’s classic short story “Metamporphis.”

Published in 1915 the story centers around Gregor Samsa, a traveling salesman who becomes transformed into a monstrous, yet indistinguishable vermin (perhaps a beetle or a cockroach). It is never explained in the story why Samsa transforms, nor did Kafka ever give an explanation.

This nightmarish image of the human-insect lodged in our imaginations is now a Google doodle marking the 130th anniversary of Kafka's birth on July 3 1883 - but so far, in a machination worthy of the master himself, in almost all of the world except for the US and UK, the UK Guardian reports.

 

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