Secret Site Map
Friday, November 28, 2014

Home News Scientists Studying Mysterious Disease Responsible for Bat Deaths

Scientists Studying Mysterious Disease Responsible for Bat Deaths

Vertebrate Pests

A recent story in the Boston Globe reviews the work of Tom Kunz, a Boston University bat expert who is investigating "white-nose syndrome" which is killing bats throughout the Northeast.

Boston.com | December 1, 2009

A recent story in the Boston Globe reviews the work of Tom Kunz, a Boston University bat expert who is investigating "white-nose syndrome" which is killing bats throughout the Northeast.

At least 1 million bats have died in the past three years from a mysterious disease called white-nose syndrome, posing serious questions for our environment. One Boston University biologist is leading the hunt for answers.
Thomas Kunz, a biology professor and director of the Center for Ecology and Conservation at Boston University, shows the remains of several little brown bats found on the floor of Aeolus Cave in southern Vermont. The animals were killed by white-nose syndrome, which has decimated bat populations in New York and spread across the Northeast and into South Atlantic States.  Preeminent scientists are calling the deaths the most precipitous decline of North American wildlife in human history.

Click here to read the abbreviated version of the article.

Click here to read the full-length version.

Source: Boston Globe

Top news

NPMA Announces Opening for Director of Regulatory Affairs Position

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) is seeking a qualified regulatory affairs professional to direct the day-to-day management and execution of NPMA’s federal and state regulatory affairs programs

Ehrlich Selected to Protect National Landmarks

The company has been selected by the National Park Service to install and maintain effective termite control systems for 14 national historic sites in the Delaware Valley, including Independence Hall.

NC State: Warmer Temps Limit Impact of Parasites, Boost Pest Populations

Research from North Carolina State University shows that some insect pests are thriving in warm, urban environments and developing earlier, limiting the impact of parasitoid wasps that normally help keep those pest populations in check.

Fruit Flies Learn From Others, Researchers Say

When female fruit flies have to decide where to lay their eggs, they take their lead from what they see most others in their group do, new research shows.

May Berenbaum Receives New Species of Cockroach Named After Her

During Entomology 2014, ESA’s annual meeting in Portland, Ore., Dr. Berenbaum was presented with specimens of a new cockroach named after her.

x