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Home News Minnesota Company Adds Bed Bug Detection Dog

Minnesota Company Adds Bed Bug Detection Dog

Bed bugs

Lil Bro leads Brothers Services’ pest control division with his nose.

| July 26, 2010

GRANT, Minn. – Brothers Services, a home services company in the Twin Cities, recently purchased Lil Bro, a bed bug-detecting dog.

As part of the company’s pest control division, Lil Bro is a 2-year-old Terrier mix with a 98-percent accuracy rate for detecting bed bugs. Rescued from a shelter in Florida, Lil Bro was trained through J and K Canine’s Entomology Canine Detection program, which was developed in conjunction with the University of Florida. After an extensive 4-month training program, Clay and Tom Kendhammer, owners of Brothers Services, bought Lil Bro and made him a valuable team member in the company’s Pest Control division.

“It’s really amazing watching Lil Bro sniff out bed bugs,” says Tom Kendhammer. “Every time he finds bed bugs, his ears perk up and he starts scratching the area, telling his trainer that there are bed bugs present.” Once bed bugs are detected, Brother Services goes to work, eliminating the pests with the company’s Fire and Ice extermination process.

Brothers Services Pest Control division offers bed bug detection services, bed bug extermination services, and quarterly and monthly preventative programs for hotels, apartments, multi-housing units and residential homes.  

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