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Mullany Outlines Goals For ServiceMaster Brands

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Hank Mullany, president and CEO of ServiceMaster, is pushing the Memphis-based home and commercial services company into new areas with digital technology. But he’s also emphasizing consistency in interactions between associates and customers.

| October 14, 2011

Hank Mullany, president and CEO of ServiceMaster, is pushing the Memphis-based home and commercial services company into new areas with digital technology. But he’s also emphasizing consistency in interactions between associates and customers.

Hank Mullany has been head of ServiceMaster since February. He took the helm of a company that boasts seven brands, 8.2 million customers a year in 22 countries at 6,900 facilities and 24,000 associates, plus another 31,000 employed by ServiceMaster franchises.

“For consumers time is a key currency,” Mullany said this week in an interview with The Daily News. “People don’t have enough time in their day-to-day lives. They are looking for us to simplify their lives for them by doing it for them. … They want to interact with us the way they want to interact with us.”

Increasingly that means incorporating hand-held digital devices and smartphone apps, which allow associates to give cost estimates and write bills on the spot or allow customers to monitor the services on their own time and interact without any personal contact.

ServiceMaster’s Terminix brand has an iPhone app and a service platform for associates in the field, and the company plans to unveil a similar platform for its American Home Shield brand in March.

“This is game-changing stuff,” Mullany said. “It’s also increased the productivity of our associates. They don’t have to shuffle back and forth to the office. Hand-held devices are the future, whether it’s customers interacting with us or associates out in the field.”

The article also noted that one of Mullaney’s goals is to graft Terminix’s consistency from one branch to another in responding to customers about TruGreen.

“Terminix has done a great job in decreasing the variability from one branch to another,” he said. “And so much of the service industry is just decreasing that variability and getting good consistency.”

Mullany said the two businesses are similar but was quick to declare this isn’t a prelude to any kind of combination of the two.

“We’ve got a search on for the open president position and we’ve got a couple of finalists that are great leaders and I think would be a great addition to the (TruGreen) team,” he said.

Click here to read the entire story.

Source. Memphis Daily News

 

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