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New York City to Cut Half of its Pest Control Jobs

Vertebrate Pests

The department plans to get rid of 57 out of 84 full-time pest control aide positions, the workers who clean up trash on properties where rodent infestations have been reported.

| March 31, 2010

The New York City Health Department announced plans to get rid of 57 out of 84 full-time pest control aide positions, the workers who clean up trash on properties where rodent infestations have been reported. The move is the latest in a series of cuts designed to help close a ballooning budget deficit.

The aides respond to 311 calls reporting infestations in buildings, usually empty or partly empty ones, and try to get the landlord to address the situation. If the landlord won't step up, the aides take care of the immediate problem, clean up the mess and set up traps to ward off future pest invasions, reports amNew York

The city didn't say how often the pest control teams are dispatched, but did note that the cuts would save $1.5 million next fiscal year, according to the paper.

Click here to read the entire article.

Source: amNewYork

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