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Rats Multiplying, Getting Bolder, NYC Subway Workers Say

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Disgusted subway workers say rats underground are multiplying and getting bolder, and are a health risk to them and passengers, according to an article on MSNBC.com.

| September 23, 2011

NEW YORK — Disgusted subway workers say rats underground are multiplying and getting bolder, and are a health risk to them and passengers, according to an article on MSNBC.com.

Paul Flores, who has been a station agent for 12 years, said the problem is widespread.

"It's the same thing all over," he said. "Less trash pickups, the cans fill to the top and rats just eat off that."

The subway workers' union, TWU Local 100, has started a campaign called New Yorkers Deserve a Rat-Free Subway, and is urging commuters to sign an online petition in hopes of making a statement to the MTA.

Transit workers also demonstrated Wednesday in front of Jamaica Central Terminal where, according to both workers and passengers, a terrible rodent problem persists. Workers passed out pamphlets to riders and solicited signatures for their online petition, telling people, "If You Smell Something, Sign Something."

 

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