Secret Site Map
Friday, April 18, 2014

Home News Byron Nelson, Ex-Schendel Pest Control Owner, Dies

Byron Nelson, Ex-Schendel Pest Control Owner, Dies

People

Nelson and his wife owned and operated the family business, Schendel Pest Control, from 1970 until they sold the business in 2008.

| November 12, 2013

DUNDEE — Byron Keith Nelson, 74, died Nov. 10, at his home. Born April 8, 1939, in Clay Center, he was the son of Raymond Emanuel and Nina Irene (Fritz) Nelson. He was raised in Cleburne, Olsburg and Alta Vista areas, graduating from Alta Vista High School. He attended Kansas State University, studying biology and wildlife management. On Sept. 11, 1960, he married Carolyn Parsons in White city. She survives. A Great Bend resident since 1970, coming from Lawrence, he and his wife owned and operated the family business, Schendel Pest Control, from 1970 until they sold the business in 2008. MNelson was an active member of Trinity Lutheran Church, being active on many boards, Sunday School, and the choir. He was also active in Stephen’s Ministry, living out his faith, and a member of the Kansas Pest Control Association, serving as president in 1985 and Hall of Fame inductee in 2000. Survivors include his wife, Carolyn Nelson, and three sons.
 

Top news

More Mazdas Recalled Due to Spider Problem

The latest recall involves 42,000 Mazda6 midsize sedans from the 2010-12 model years, and equipped with the 2.5-liter, four-cylinder engine.

Photos: Bed Bugs vs. Bat Bugs

Additional photos from Dr. Michael Potter for the August PCT feature 'Holy Cow...Bat Bugs and Bird Bugs.'

Win a Copy of the New PCT Commercial Pest Management Book

Enter your name for a chance to win a copy of this new industry resource focused on treating a variety of commercial accounts.

Allgood Announces Corporate Promotions; Acquisition of Rich Exterminators

The company’s promotions are part of its strategic growth plans. Rich Exterminators is a Lawrenceville, Ga.-based company founded by Howard Rich in 1989.

A Look at Bed Bug Look-Alikes

The IPM Institute of North America has a review of five commonly encountered pests, including bat bugs (pictured), that can be misidentified as bed bugs.