Secret Site Map
Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Home News State Regulations Alter Pest Control in Oregon Schools

State Regulations Alter Pest Control in Oregon Schools

Pest Management In Schools

Pesticides, other chemicals now required by state to be used as a last resort for pest controls

| July 10, 2012

EUGENE, Ore. – A new state law went into effect this month requiring Oregon schools try nonchemical methods for ridding pests from school grounds, The Register-Guard reports.

The law requires schools to practice integrated pest management, which allows pesticides, insecticides and other chemicals to still be used, but as a last rather than first resort, the newspaper reported.

Tim Stock, integrated pest management education specialist at Oregon State University, told The Register-Guard because school children are still growing and developing, they are more at risk for harm from pest control chemicals.

A state licensed operator will be required to deploy a chemical solution on Oregon school grounds as well, the newspaper reported. This may either be a pest control professional or a school employee that has obtained a license.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

(Source: The Register-Guard)

Top news

Terminix-Triad Adopts New Approach to Employee Recruitment

The company is using social media to attract potential employees and working with community colleges to raise awareness of pest control as a possible career path for students.

FMC Corporation to Acquire Cheminova

FMC Corporation announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Cheminova A/S, a wholly owned subsidiary of Auriga Industries A/S

Patented Portable Heat Injector System

The new heating system was created with significant input from pest control companies.

Police Investigate Death of Jill Su, Wife of Dr. Nan-Yao Su

Davie, Fla. police have ruled the death of 59-year-old Jill Su a homicide, multiple news outlets report. Jill Su is the wife of noted University of Florida Entomology Professor Dr. Nan-Yao Su.

Climate, Genetics Can Affect How Long Virus-Carrying Mosquitoes Live

The longer a mosquito lives, the better its odds of transmitting disease to humans or animals, according to new research from the University of Florida.