Secret Site Map
Friday, April 18, 2014

Home News State Regulations Alter Pest Control in Oregon Schools

State Regulations Alter Pest Control in Oregon Schools

Pest Management In Schools

Pesticides, other chemicals now required by state to be used as a last resort for pest controls

| July 10, 2012

EUGENE, Ore. – A new state law went into effect this month requiring Oregon schools try nonchemical methods for ridding pests from school grounds, The Register-Guard reports.

The law requires schools to practice integrated pest management, which allows pesticides, insecticides and other chemicals to still be used, but as a last rather than first resort, the newspaper reported.

Tim Stock, integrated pest management education specialist at Oregon State University, told The Register-Guard because school children are still growing and developing, they are more at risk for harm from pest control chemicals.

A state licensed operator will be required to deploy a chemical solution on Oregon school grounds as well, the newspaper reported. This may either be a pest control professional or a school employee that has obtained a license.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

(Source: The Register-Guard)

Top news

More Mazdas Recalled Due to Spider Problem

The latest recall involves 42,000 Mazda6 midsize sedans from the 2010-12 model years, and equipped with the 2.5-liter, four-cylinder engine.

Photos: Bed Bugs vs. Bat Bugs

Additional photos from Dr. Michael Potter for the August PCT feature 'Holy Cow...Bat Bugs and Bird Bugs.'

Win a Copy of the New PCT Commercial Pest Management Book

Enter your name for a chance to win a copy of this new industry resource focused on treating a variety of commercial accounts.

Allgood Announces Corporate Promotions; Acquisition of Rich Exterminators

The company’s promotions are part of its strategic growth plans. Rich Exterminators is a Lawrenceville, Ga.-based company founded by Howard Rich in 1989.

A Look at Bed Bug Look-Alikes

The IPM Institute of North America has a review of five commonly encountered pests, including bat bugs (pictured), that can be misidentified as bed bugs.