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Home News Earlier Termite Activity Possible, Says Orkin’s Warneke

Earlier Termite Activity Possible, Says Orkin’s Warneke

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The above-average temperatures much of the U.S. has seen recently could mean earlier termite activity, according to Orkin’s Jim Warneke.

| February 13, 2012

ATLANTA — According to Orkin, the above-average temperatures much of the U.S. has seen recently could mean earlier termite activity. Subterranean termite swarms have already been seen in south-central Florida and will move west into the Gulf states, north into the Carolinas and then spread throughout the country.

When the temperature rises above 60 degrees, termites often swarm inside homes before moving outdoors to search for food and water. Jim Warneke, Orkin's Southeast division technical services manager, noted homeowners should not assume termite swarms are flying ants, a common misperception based on appearance. Termites are found in every state except Alaska and thrive in warm and damp, humid climates.

"Termites get moisture from the ground or use moisture found in a home or building from leaks or condensation," said Warneke. "Moisture combined with increasing temperatures make springtime conditions in the South ideal for termite activity."

 

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