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Orkin Reports Increased Termite Activity in Some Southeastern Branches

Termite Control

The company reported a recent increase in termite calls at some Southeastern branches, including those in Florida and South Carolina.

| March 29, 2011

ATLANTA — March 20 marks the first day of spring, bringing warmer temperatures and sporadic rain showers to the Southeast. Whether gardening, spring cleaning or playing outdoors, people are livelier with the change in weather, and they aren't the only ones. Termites are becoming increasingly active as well. Orkin has reported a recent increase in termite calls at some Southeastern branches, including those in Florida and South Carolina.

"Moisture from the rain coupled with increasing temperatures make springtime conditions in the South ideal for termite activity," said Jim Warneke, Orkin southeast division technical services manager. "Subterranean termites, which live underground in the soil, thrive in humid climates with temperatures above 60 degrees."

According to the National Pest Management Association, termites cause about $5 billion in property damage per year in the U.S. While termites can be most visible in the spring, these pests damage property year round.

"While subterranean are the most widespread and common group of termites in the Southeast, drywood termites also can be found in areas with warmer climates that do not reach freezing temperatures in the winter," said Warneke. "Subterranean termites are the most destructive of this 250-million-year-old pest, but drywood termites also can cause serious damage to a home's structure and amenities, like hardwood flooring and furniture."

 

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