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CimeXa Now Available in New York

Supplier News

Rockwell Labs announced that CimeXa insecticide dust is now registered in New York.

| March 20, 2012

NORTH KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Rockwell Labs announced that CimeXa insecticide dust is now registered in New York.

CimeXa quickly kills bed bug adults, nymphs, and nymphs hatched from dusted eggs, including pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs. It also controls fleas, ticks, lice, roaches, ants, firebrats, silverfish, spiders and mites, and may also be used for the prevention and treatment of drywood termites. CimeXa is odorless, non-staining, non-repellent and lasts up to ten years when undisturbed. The broad label allows the product to be used to treat cracks, crevices, voids, mattresses, carpets, pet rest areas, attics and many other areas. It can also be mixed with water and applied as a spray.

The engineered silica-based dust has exceptional absorption of water (in liquid form) and oil, destroying the insect’s waxy cuticle, causing rapid dehydration and death. CimeXa is packed in quart size bottles which hold 4 oz of the extremely light dust and 5 gallon buckets that hold 5 lbs. The standard usage rate is 2 oz per 100 square feet. CimeXa is available now through your distributor. It is not yet registered in California.

For more information visit www.rockwelllabs.com.

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