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Scientists Study Flight Pattern of Rome's Starlings

Bird Management

An article from the Global Post reviews how scientists are studying the mathematical precision of the flight pattern of Rome's starlings.

Global Post | December 3, 2009

An article from the Global Post reviews how scientists are studying the mathematical precision of the flight pattern of Rome's starlings.

The article notes that for a few hours after dusk, the sky above the city’s riverbank, piazzas and wealthy neighborhoods becomes plagued by thousands of European starlings zooming back and forth in fantastic tornado-like formations. Cacophonous calls echo throughout the city, as the dark-winged creatures soar through the air in syn.

Rome’s pedestrians, along with roads, cars and monuments, soon become targets for a storm of droppings.

For the past three years, biologist Andrea Buscemi and her crew of volunteer bird-busters have spent the month of November broadcasting distress calls throughout the greenest neighborhoods in Rome.

Click here to read the entire story.

Source: Global Post

 

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