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Statue of Liberty Now Protected From Termites With Sentricon

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The original Sentricon System was installed around the perimeter of the statue in 1996. Earlier this year, the Sentricon Sentricon with Always Active technology was installed.

| October 14, 2011

NEW YORK - The Statue of Liberty, an icon of American history and pride, now bears the torch for the Sentricon Termite Colony Elimination System with new Always Active technology.

Subterranean termites were believed to have been introduced to Liberty Island during the statue’s 1986 renovation. First detected in 1994, the termite infestation worsened until 1996. At one point, termites were swarming so severely that the museum inside the statue had to temporarily close. The original Sentricon System was installed around the perimeter of the statue in 1996, and monitoring of the Sentricon stations in 1997 showed entire termite colony elimination. Since then, the Statue of Liberty has been continuously protected by the Sentricon System.

Earlier this year, the Sentricon Sentricon with Always Active technology was installed. The revolutionary new Recruit HD termite bait, a component of Always Active technology, is immediately available to termites in all stations. Requiring nearly a decade of research to develop, this highly durable and dense bait is able to stand up to harsh weather conditions for multiple years and has been proven preferable to termites over wood.

Lady Liberty is not the only historic site currently protected by the Sentricon System. The White House, Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Ellis Island, My Old Kentucky Home, Iolani Palace in Honolulu and the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C., all are protected with the Sentricon System. It’s not just notable sites - millions of properties have chosen to be protected by the Sentricon System as well.

 

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