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Home News Termites at Ellis Island Denied Entry by Sentricon

Termites at Ellis Island Denied Entry by Sentricon

Termite Control Products

Sentricon was first installed at Ellis Island in 2001.

| July 23, 2012

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Since 2001, Sentricon has been helping keep pests away from one of the U.S.'s most iconic places.

The Sentricon Termite Colony Elimination System was installed at Ellis Island in New York City in 2001 to help prevent future termite infestations. In 2004, termite activity was discovered and within months, the termite colony was eliminated.

In 2010, Sentricon with  Always Active technology was installed on the site. Always Active features a "highly desirable" termite bait and remains in the ground every day to fight against termite attacks, according to manufacturer Dow AgroSciences.

An annual inspection in April of 2012 confirmed that a termite colony had been eliminated by Sentricon's Recruit HD bait.

"Reports from across the country confirm that termites feed readily on Recruit HD termite bait," said Jill Zeller, product manager for Sentricon. "In our research, it was actually preferred in choice tests against wood — their natural food."

To learn more, visit Sentricon.com.

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