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Industry Mourns the Loss of Jeff Singley

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Singley, president of Arrow Exterminators, died in Winter Park, Colo., on Friday, at age 46. Singley was appointed president of the company earlier this month.

| March 26, 2012

Jeff Singley

Jeff Singley, president of Arrow Exterminators, died in Winter Park, Colo., on Friday, at age 46. Singley started his career with Arrow in 1991, as a salesman in Macon, Ga., focusing on growing the business in the Macon and Savannah markets. He was quickly promoted to branch manager and then region VP for all of South Georgia. He helped grow the South Georgia area to more than $1 million in revenue in two years. That same area now generates $14 million in business for Arrow.   

Singley’s leadership, along with others, helped grow the company from nine locations and $10 million in revenue in 1991 to 70 offices operating in 9 states and generating $110 million in revenue today. He was instrumental in growing the company both through internal growth and strategic acquisitions. Singley was good at finding, training, recognizing, rewarding and keeping only the best people, a characteristic that served him well. During the course of his career, he won all the awards the company bestows, many of them on multiple occasions, including the Starkey Thomas Manager of the Year Award, the John Millican Impact Player of the Year Award, the Gerald Ellerbee Salesman of the Year Award, and various Golden Arrow and Beyond the Call awards.  In 2009, as Arrow’s Executive Vice President, Singley was honored by Syngenta Professional Products and Pest Control Technology magazine as one of its Crown Leadership Award winners.  This prestigious award spotlights individuals who have made significant contributions to the growth and development of the structural pest control industry, with characteristics such as strong leadership and integrity.  An active member of many local and state industry associations, Singley also served on the WDO committee for the National Pest Management Association. He was named chief operating officer in June of 2010 before being appointed president of the company earlier this month.

Survivors include his wife, Liz Singley of Americus; sons Kyle and Ryan Singley of Americus; a brother and sister-in-law, Ronald and Melissa Singley of Americus; mother and father Laverne and Cliff Singley of Americus, Ga; and mother-in-law and father-in-law Rubielen and Howard Norris of Bishop, Ga.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday, March 28, at 11 a.m., in the Williams Road Church of Christ.  Out-of town guests are invited to join the family in the fellowship hall upon conclusion of the service. The family will receive friends Tuesday, March 27, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the Greg Hancock Funeral Chapel in Americus.

In lieu of flowers the family has asked that donations be made to: The Jeff Singley Memorial Fund, Citizens Bank of Americus, 119 North Lee Street, P.O. Box 1128, Americus, Ga. 31709, phone: (229) 924-4011. This fund will benefit the Americus community of which Singley was an active member.

 

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