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Termites Damage Part of Imelda Marcos’ Collection

Termite Control

Termites, storms and neglect have damaged part of former Philippine first lady Imelda Marcos’ legendary collection of shoes and other possessions

| October 4, 2012

MANILA, Philippines — Termites, storms and neglect have damaged part of former Philippine first lady Imelda Marcos’ legendary collection of shoes and other possessions left behind after she and her dictator husband were driven into U.S. exile by a 1986 popular revolt.

Hundreds of pieces of late strongman Ferdinand Marcos’ clothing, including the formal native see-through barong shirts he wore during his two-decade rule, have also begun to gather mold and fray after being stored for years without protection at the presidential palace and later at Manila’s National Museum, officials told The Associated Press on Sunday.

According to AP article, termites had damaged the heel and sole of a white Pierre Cardin shoe.

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Source: Washington Post



 

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