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Texas A&M Entomology Breaks Ground on New Building

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The university is building a new $4 million building to house the Center for Urban and Structural Entomology.

| July 29, 2013

COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Construction on an urban and structural entomology facility will begin soon. The facility will ensure the Texas A&M University System remains at the forefront of urban entomology to discover, develop and implement research to control insects in and around our homes and other structures, university officials said.

The planned Texas A&M department of entomology facility will be paired with the Endowed Chair for Urban and Structural Entomology to conduct Texas A&M AgriLife Research, teaching and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service programs for decades to come, officials said.

The Center for Urban and Structural Entomology's goals are to:
•    Attract and support students and faculty of urban entomology within a state of the art facility to support relevant research, teaching, Extension, and other outreach programs.
•    Teach and mentor undergraduate and graduate students with interests in urban entomology.
•    Develop and implement sustainable technologies to protect structures from the invasion of wood destroying organisms.
•    Address issues associated with management of insect populations associated with the harvest, storage, processing and transportation of food commodities.
•    Address the environmental and health risks associated with insects as potential vectors of human and animal disease agents.
•    Discover and develop innovative means, methods, and approaches to managing insect populations.

Upon completion, this 10,000 square foot building will provide office space for the Endowed Chair, Principal Investigators, Research Assistants, Graduate Students, and the Correspondence Course Coordinator. Also included are individual laboratory spaces for maintaining colonies of ants, termites, and cockroaches, as well as a general insectary for all other insect colonies such as bed bugs and stored product pests.
The facility is being made possible in-part through a generous pledged gift from the O. Wayne Rollins Foundation.
There will be a facility naming ceremony and subsequent reception on Aug. 9. For more information contact Monica Delisa, assistant vice president for development, Texas A&M AgriLife, 979-847-9314, m-delisa@tamu.edu.

The facility is being made possible in-part through a generous pledged gift from the O. Wayne Rollins Foundation.

There will be a facility naming ceremony and subsequent reception on Aug. 9. For more information contact Monica Delisa, assistant vice president for development, Texas A&M AgriLife, 979/847-9314, m-delisa@tamu.edu.
 

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