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Home News Today Show Includes 'What's Bugging You' Segment

Today Show Includes 'What's Bugging You' Segment

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The March 28 show included a segment on spring pests that featured NPMA's Missy Henriksen.

| March 27, 2014

The March 28 Today Show included a segment titled "What's Bugging You" in its 9:00 a.m. hour. (Click here to watch). The piece addressed spring pests and many of the threats associated with them. Missy Henriksen, NPMA's Vice President of Public Affairs, discussed termites, ants, ticks, stinging insects, and occasional invaders including stink bugs, centipedes, silverfish, and crickets. The segment will feature a myriad of live insects and related props.

NPMA thanks the numerous companies and individuals who responded to requests for needed show-and-tell items and general help including Adam's Pest Control, American Pest, American Pest Solutions, Assured Environments, Home Paramount, Connor's Pest Control,  Greg Baumann, i2LResearch USA, Oklahoma State University, Orkin, ProTech Pest Control, Liz Pereira/University of Florida, University of Georgia, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Ted Granovsky. We hope to share a clip of the segment in next week's ePestWorld.

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