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About 200,000 Bees Removed from Florida Property

Pesticide Issues

Jeff McChesney of Truly Nolen ridded the property of the bees, which had taken up residence in an old trailer.

| May 5, 2010

TAMPA - In mid-March, city officials warned John Scherer about his raggedy fence and the old camper with expired tags in his back yard.

Officials wanted Scherer to clean the place up and get rid of the camper. They agreed to help the 68-year-old, who doesn't have the money to clean it up himself.

Then they discovered the bees.

"That changed everything," said Scherer, 68, who has lived at his Pinellas Park home for 51 years.

That's because inside the small popup camper, officials found an unusual group of squatters: about 200,000 European bees. Before any work got done, the bees had to go.

On Tuesday evening, Jeff McChesney of Truly Nolen  got rid of the bees, extracting about 80 pounds of honey in the process. "There's probably another 80 pounds in there, in the walls, but I just couldn't get to it," said McChesney, who planned to take the honey home and give it away.

Click here to read the entire story.

Source: Tampabay.com
 

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