Secret Site Map
Sunday, May 24, 2015

Home News West Indian Subterranean Termites Moving Northward in Florida

West Indian Subterranean Termites Moving Northward in Florida

Termite Control

The University of Florida has confirmed an infestation of the West Indian subterranean termite in Loxahatchee – the first one in the state outside of a single Miami neighborhood.

| July 12, 2012

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — The University of Florida has confirmed an infestation of the West Indian subterranean termite in Loxahatchee – the first one in the state outside of a single Miami neighborhood – an indication that this species is moving to the north. A Hulett Environmental Services technician found the termite infestation during an inspection.

Subterranean termites are by far the most destructive species of termites and are the species most frequently found throughout Florida. They can collapse an entire building, meaning possible financial ruin for a homeowner. In the United States, about $4.5 billion is spent each year to control subterranean termite infestations and repair damage they cause.

“This species of subterranean termite is found in Jamaica and the Grand Cayman, and it was 1995 when it was first discovered in this country in Miami,” said Rudolf H. Scheffrahn, the professor of entomology who confirmed Hulett’s findings. “The termites were most likely transported to Loxahatchee a number of years ago in a potted plant from the Little Haiti neighborhood where it is common.”

The West Indian subterranean termites are small, brown and swarm during early summer evenings. They look similar to drywood termites, but getting rid of an infestation requires a different treatment protocol. That’s why it’s critical to understand what type of termite is infesting the area.

“It’s easy to misidentify the West Indian subterranean for drywood termites and spend hundreds of dollars on treating the wrong species,” said Tim Hulett, the company’s president and CEO, and an entomologist. “The wasted money is bad enough, but if left untreated the subterranean termites can cause extensive damage that will be much more expensive to treat and repair later on.”

Since the West Indian subterranean termite has demonstrated its ability to successfully establish colonies in South Florida, Scheffrahn expects it to continue to spread over time. They nest in soil and can attack any structure through mud tubes they build to connect their nests to wood. Since they’re either underground or hidden in wood, they are hard to find and identify.

Top news

Fastest Growing U.S. Cities in West And South, Census Bureau Reports

Most cities with populations above 100,000 in those regions grew significantly between 2000 and 2010, and 2010 and 2013, according to the bureau's report, which was released last week.

New Bee Survey Released

Losses of managed honey bee colonies were 23.1 percent for the 2014-2015 winter but summer losses exceeded winter numbers for the first time, making annual losses for the year 42.1 percent, according to preliminary results of the annual survey conducted by the Bee Informed Partnership, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Apiary Inspectors of America.

Terminix Announces Top Mosquito Cities Based on Twitter Complaints

According to research by Terminix, the worst whining about mosquitoes came from Goodland, a small town in the northwest corner of Kansas. Terminix searched through approximately 200 billion tweets posted in 2014 to determine which United States city is most pestered by mosquitoes.

White House Releases Pollinator Action Plan

The Strategy, released last week, and its accompanying science-based Pollinator Research Action Plan outline needs and priority actions to better understand pollinator losses and improve pollinator health. These actions will be supported by coordination of existing Federal research efforts and accompanied by a request to Congress for additional resources to respond to the pollinator losses that are being experienced.

Legislative Day Video Coverage

More than 325 pest control industry professionals traveled to our nation’s capital in March for NPMA Legislative Day 2015, lead-sponsored by FMC Professional Solutions. In the day-plus of activities, PCOs attended sessions on important industry-related issues and heard from prominent national speakers before heading to Capitol Hill to meet with their congressional representatives. In addition to news articles, PCT’s coverage includes video interviews.

x