Secret Site Map
Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Home News Ants Turned into 'Zombies' by 'Mind-Control' Fungus

Ants Turned into 'Zombies' by 'Mind-Control' Fungus

Ants

A new study shows that the parasite Ophiocordyceps unilateralis infects ants and then manipulates their behavior.

| August 18, 2010

The evidence is an ancient fossilised leaf bearing unmistakable traces of a natural horror story.

Dr David Hughes, from the University of Exeter, who studied the find, said: ''This leaf shows clear signs of one well-documented form of zombie parasite, a fungus which infects ants and then manipulates their behavior.''

The parasite, Ophiocordyceps unilateralis, appears to take over the minds of infected ants.

The insects are forced to leave their nests and head for a leaf that provides ideal conditions for the fungus to reproduce.

On arrival the ants are compelled to bite hard on a major vein of the leaf before dying. The ''death grip'' leaves the ant in a perfect position for the fungus to grow and release its infectious spores.

The death grip bite leaves a very distinctive mark, and it was this scientists discovered on the 48-million-year-old leaf specimen from the Rhine Rift Valley in Hesse, Germany.

Click here to read the entire article.

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Top news

Patented Portable Heat Injector System Introduced

The new heating system was created with significant input from pest control companies.

Terminix-Triad Adopts New Approach to Employee Recruitment

The company is using social media to attract potential employees and working with community colleges to raise awareness of pest control as a possible career path for students.

FMC Corporation to Acquire Cheminova

FMC Corporation announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Cheminova A/S, a wholly owned subsidiary of Auriga Industries A/S

Police Investigate Death of Jill Su, Wife of Dr. Nan-Yao Su

Davie, Fla. police have ruled the death of 59-year-old Jill Su a homicide, multiple news outlets report. Jill Su is the wife of noted University of Florida Entomology Professor Dr. Nan-Yao Su.

Climate, Genetics Can Affect How Long Virus-Carrying Mosquitoes Live

The longer a mosquito lives, the better its odds of transmitting disease to humans or animals, according to new research from the University of Florida.