Noted Entomologist Thomas Eisner Passes Away

isner, a groundbreaking authority on insects whose research revealed the complex chemistry that they use to repel predators, attract mates and protect their young, died earlier this month.

April 7, 2011

Thomas Eisner, a groundbreaking authority on insects whose research revealed the complex chemistry that they use to repel predators, attract mates and protect their young, died earlier this month. He was 81.
 
The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said Cornell University, where he had been a professor of chemical ecology.
 
In the introduction to Dr. Eisner's 2003 book "For Love of Insects," the Harvard biologist E. O. Wilson called him "the modern Fabre," after Jean-Henri Fabre, the French pioneer of insect research. 
 
A tribute to Eisner recently appeared in the New York Times.

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