Scientists Studying Mysterious Disease Responsible for Bat Deaths

A recent story in the Boston Globe reviews the work of Tom Kunz, a Boston University bat expert who is investigating "white-nose syndrome" which is killing bats throughout the Northeast.

December 1, 2009

A recent story in the Boston Globe reviews the work of Tom Kunz, a Boston University bat expert who is investigating "white-nose syndrome" which is killing bats throughout the Northeast.

At least 1 million bats have died in the past three years from a mysterious disease called white-nose syndrome, posing serious questions for our environment. One Boston University biologist is leading the hunt for answers.
Thomas Kunz, a biology professor and director of the Center for Ecology and Conservation at Boston University, shows the remains of several little brown bats found on the floor of Aeolus Cave in southern Vermont. The animals were killed by white-nose syndrome, which has decimated bat populations in New York and spread across the Northeast and into South Atlantic States.  Preeminent scientists are calling the deaths the most precipitous decline of North American wildlife in human history.

Click here to read the abbreviated version of the article.

Click here to read the full-length version.

Source: Boston Globe

Related

WNV Blamed for Utah Bald Eagle Deaths

January 3, 2014

A mysterious die-off of 27 bald eagles in Utah is being blamed on West Nile virus, after lab tests from the state's Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR) showed the deadly illness was behind the... Read More