‘Dirty Jobs’ Crew Visits Purdue Entomology

Mike Rowe, host of "Dirty Jobs," which airs on the Discovery Channel, recently spent about eight hours working with Purdue students who study forensic entomology.

July 30, 2010

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Mike Rowe, host of "Dirty Jobs," which airs on the Discovery Channel, recently spent about eight hours working with Purdue students who study forensic entomology. That's the process in which insects are used to determine a subject's time of death and other information to aid in criminal investigations.

Rowe's crew captured every moment as the students presented him with four dead pigs in different locations, and gave him a hands-on look at how maggots and other insects can be used to determine time of death.
For Rowe, who has done more than 300 dirty jobs since the show began six years ago, his time on Purdue's campus ranks among the nastiest,

"We were here from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., which for us is about half of the time we would normally spend, but it had three times the stink that we would normally encounter and probably five times the smarts we would normally deal with," he said. "In the end, it was a very compact and efficient 'Dirty Jobs.'

"You've got some really big brains doing some important work, and at the same time you have young kids learning the trade."

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Source: Purdue Entomology

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