Tawny Crazy Ants Profiled in Scientific American

Tawny Crazy Ants Profiled in Scientific American

The article notes that tawny crazy ants are able to prevail over fire ants because they produce chemicals they then rub on themselves as an antidote to fire ant venom.

February 21, 2014

Tawny crazy ants (Nylanderia fulva), also referred to as Rasberry crazy ants, are the subject of a new article in Scientific American. The ants, which have spread throughout Texas and the Gulf states, are unseating the reigning imported fire ants that have infested the region. The article notes that tawny crazy ants are able to prevail over fire ants because they produce chemicals they then rub on themselves as an antidote to fire ant venom.

Click here to read the entire article.

Source: Scientific American
 

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