Secret Site Map
Sunday, April 19, 2015

Home News Mosquito Research Shows ‘Your Worst Enemy Could be Your Best Friend’

Mosquito Research Shows ‘Your Worst Enemy Could be Your Best Friend’

Mosquitoes

Asian tiger mosquitoes are being saved by the very predator that usually eats them — and how that helps protect humans from diseases like dengue fever.

| March 26, 2010

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Your worst enemy can sometimes also be your best friend, according to entomologists from the University of Florida and Illinois State University.

Their research has shown how one mosquito species is being saved by the very predator that usually eats it — and how that helps protect humans from diseases like dengue fever, according to a press release from the University of Florida.

In the 1980s the U.S. began importing a large number of used tires from Asia. Water that had collected in these tires carried the larvae and eggs of the Asian tiger mosquito, a pest with a voracious appetite known to carry disease.

This invasive mosquito is more aggressive in its search for food than the more docile native mosquitoes, and theoretically, should have driven the native species to near extinction as it spread, said Phil Lounibos, an entomologist with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

To read the entire article, click here.

 

Top news

Family Believed to be Sickened by Pesticide at Virgin Islands Resort

A Delaware family is back home and in the hospital after getting sick while on vacation, due to possible exposure to methyl bromide.

Terminix Acquires Team Too Termite & Pest Control

Team Too, headquartered in Corona, Calif., has five offices throughout California and specializes in commercial and multi-family accounts.

Termidor SC Can Now Be Applied Up to Four Times Per Year

BASF announced the approval of new label use directions by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that allow Termidor SC termiticide/insecticide to be used up to four times per year.

Catseye Hosts Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony for New Florida Office

The company's customers and other guests celebrated the one-year anniversary of Catseye's Bonita Springs, Fla., office.

Tick-Borne 'Bourbon Virus' Cause of Kansas Man's Death

Researchers have identified the cause of a Kansas farmer's mysterious death last summer.

x