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Bed Bug-Detecting Dogs the Subject of New York Times Article

Bed bugs

The article cited University of Florida research that reported that well-trained dogs can detect a single live bug or egg with 96 percent accuracy.

| March 15, 2010

A recent article in the New York Times titled “A New Breed of Guard Dog Attacks Bedbug" examined the use of bed bug-detecting canines.

The article noted that increasingly real estate lawyers are urging buyers in contract to inspect apartments before they close, and in their advertising, many pest control companies encourage would-be tenants to “inspect before you rent.”

Research from the University of Florida was also cited in the article. UF researchers report that well-trained dogs can detect a single live bug or egg with 96 percent accuracy.

The Times also profiled Jeremy Ecker, whose company, the Bed Bug Inspectors, was launched six months ago. Ecker uses a puggle named Cruiser to inspect a variety of residential and commercial properties in New York City.

Click here to read the entire article.

Source: New York Times

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