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Home News Bird-B-Gone Introduces Sonic Shield

Bird-B-Gone Introduces Sonic Shield

Supplier News

The device uses sound and light to frighten away birds and other pests.

| February 8, 2013

MISSION VIEJO, Calif. — Bird-B-Gone has introduced Sonic Shield, a device that frightens birds and other unwanted pests away from property using sound and light. Self-contained and completely portable, the Sonic Shield operates on 4 AA batteries and is easily installed virtually anywhere. The versatile device has two modes of operation for around-the-clock pest deterrence: a daytime mode to repel pests using flashing LED lights and barking dog sounds; and a nighttime mode that repels pests using only the flashing LED lights—ideal for areas where night noises are not allowed.

"We are always looking for ways to help our customers keep their homes pest free," said Owner Bruce Donoho. "The sonic shield is an effective way to deter pests from your home, especially those pests that cannot hear in ultrasonic."

For more information visit www.birdbgone.com.
 

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