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Home News Catseye Pest Control Granted Membership into PESP

Catseye Pest Control Granted Membership into PESP

Pesticide Issues

The Castleton, N.Y. company has joined the U.S. EPA's Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program.

| March 22, 2013

CASTLETON, N.Y. - Catseye Pest Control has joined the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program (PESP), a voluntary program that forms partnerships with pesticide users to reduce the potential health and environmental risks associated with pesticides.

Catseye has pledged that environmental stewardship is a critical part of its Intergrated Pest Management approach, the company said. 

"Pest management is moving toward more intensive inspections, which minimize the need for chemicals and instead eliminate the very conditions that produced pest problems in the first place," said Luis Pabon, technical director at Catseye. "As a proud member of PESP, which allows us to demonstrate our committment to protecting our environment, we will continue promoting greener initiatives throughout our industry."

Catseye said the membership comes just as the company is gearing up for the busy summer. With warmer temperatures comes the beginning of a tremendous breeding period for some of home and businesses’ most problematic pests, including Carpenter ants, termites and bees.

 

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