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Health Canada Announces New Safety Measures for Rodenticides

Rodents & Mice

Health Canada is informing consumers, retailers and pest control operators of new measures to reduce the risks associated with the use of certain rodenticides.

| November 2, 2010

OTTAWA, Ontario, Canada — Health Canada is informing consumers, retailers and pest control operators of new measures to reduce the risks associated with the use of certain rodenticides.

The new measures are aimed at reducing the exposure of children, pets and non-target animals to rodenticides. Among the requirements:

  • Rodenticides used by individual consumers or professional pest control operators in areas accessible to children and pets will have to be placed in a tamper-proof bait station.
  • Rodenticides sold to individual consumers will have to be packaged together with a pre-baited, ready-to-use bait station.
  • Certain rodenticides with high levels of toxicity and that take a long time to break down in the environment will be available only to professional pest control operators or farmers for limited use.
  • Manufacturers have until December 31, 2012 to have the new labeling in place. Until then, consumers should keep these safety tips in mind when using rodenticides they may already purchased or that are still on store shelves:
  • Read the label directions and safety precautions before using any rodenticide and use only as directed.
  • Store rodenticides away from food and out of reach of children.
  • Use gloves when handling rodenticides.
  • When using rodenticides, place them in an area inaccessible to children, pets and non-targeted wildlife.
  • Use the closed bait station supplied with the rodenticide or purchase one separately.
  • Wear gloves when handling the bodies of dead rodents and wash hands thoroughly afterward.
  • Double-bag the bodies of dead rodents using plastic bags and discard in a garbage can with a secure lid.
  • Dispose of unused rodenticides at municipal hazardous waste sites or as directed on the label.

Additioanl information about the new requirements can be found in Health Canada's Re-evaluation Note on rodenticides (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/pest/_decisions/rev2010-17/index-eng.php). If you have further questions, please contact Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency at 1-800-267-6315.

Additioanl  information about controlling rodents in the Health Canada Pest Note on rats and mice cab be found at (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/pest/_pnotes/rats/index-eng.php)

 

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