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Home News Hurricane Isaac Increases Termite Concerns, Louisiana Ag Commissioner Says

Hurricane Isaac Increases Termite Concerns, Louisiana Ag Commissioner Says

Termite Control

Commissioner Mike Strain warns that termiticide-treated soil may have been washed away.

| September 17, 2012

First came Hurricane Isaac's winds and then rain and rising waters. Now termites may be the next plague from the storm, according to Agriculture-Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain. Strain said that builders and homeowners should take steps to prevent the spread of termites as homes and offices are reconstructed.

"If your community flooded and treated soil was washed away ... most likely the pesticide barrier no longer exists around your home or business and the area may need to be re-treated," Strain said. "Bait stations need to be evaluated for replacement as well."

Strain said that that during rebuilding, homeowners and businesses can also use termite-treated or termite resistant products. After construction, Strain said, baiting stations and liquid treatments can be used as tools for detecting and destroying termite colonies.

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