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Research Shows July Through September Peak Season for Bed Bugs

Bed bugs

Hot summer temperatures speed up bed beg maturation time, according to BedBug Central analysis

| July 5, 2012

 LAWRENCEVILLE, N.J. – Bed bug activity reaches its peak from July to September, marking the start of bed bug season, according to a new bed bug population analysis by BedBug Central.

Studies have shown that bed bugs develop from an egg to adult in 66 days at 64 degrees, but this maturation time decreases to 14 days at 82 degrees. This rapid development combined with an increase in bed bug movement in warmer temperatures is the suggested reason for elevated activity during summer months, BedBug Central said.

The report was conducted by BedBug Central Technical Director Jeffrey White, who reviewed the number of initial bed bug services submitted by select pest management companies throughout five regions of the country beginning January 2008 through April 2012.

White said this new data provides the public with research they can use to help promote and practice sound prevention methods and treatment options.

More details from BedBug Central's report can be found here

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