Secret Site Map
Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Home News Khapra Beetles Turning Up at U.S. Points of Entry

Khapra Beetles Turning Up at U.S. Points of Entry

News Coverage

The beetle has been turning up more frequently at U.S. points of entry, including the Port of New York and New Jersey, where U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported finding the beetles in two shipments of rice from Pakistan less than a month apart. (Photo: Purdue Entomology)

| August 26, 2011

NEWARK — The khapra beetle, a highly invasive pest that feeds on dry grains, was eradicated from the United States thanks to a costly and coordinated effort by the government in the 1950s and '60s.

But the khapra beetle has been turning up more frequently at U.S. points of entry, including the Port of New York and New Jersey, where U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported finding the beetles in two shipments of rice from Pakistan less than a month apart.

The shipments were not allowed to enter the country, and the importer was given the choice of destroying the rice or shipping it back to Pakistan, the agency said.

Anthony Bucco, a spokesman for the customs agency, declined to identify the importer involved in either shipment.

In both incidents, the customs agency said the tiny brown beetles, which measure 2-3 millimeters long, were found on the outside of plastic and burlap sacs full of rice.

The more recent incident involved two dead beetle larvae said to have been found amid a Pakastani rice shipment on Friday. The earlier incident, on July 26, involved what the agency said was a dead khapra beetle larva and one cast skin

Source:
http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2011/08/invasive_beetle_species_reappe.html

 



 

Top news

Patented Portable Heat Injector System Introduced

The new heating system was created with significant input from pest control companies.

Terminix-Triad Adopts New Approach to Employee Recruitment

The company is using social media to attract potential employees and working with community colleges to raise awareness of pest control as a possible career path for students.

FMC Corporation to Acquire Cheminova

FMC Corporation announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Cheminova A/S, a wholly owned subsidiary of Auriga Industries A/S

Police Investigate Death of Jill Su, Wife of Dr. Nan-Yao Su

Davie, Fla. police have ruled the death of 59-year-old Jill Su a homicide, multiple news outlets report. Jill Su is the wife of noted University of Florida Entomology Professor Dr. Nan-Yao Su.

Climate, Genetics Can Affect How Long Virus-Carrying Mosquitoes Live

The longer a mosquito lives, the better its odds of transmitting disease to humans or animals, according to new research from the University of Florida.