Secret Site Map
Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Home News Ants Use Multiple Antibiotics to Protect Their Colonies

Ants Use Multiple Antibiotics to Protect Their Colonies

Ants

Scientists in England have discovered that the leaf cutter ant uses multiple antibiotic-creating bacteria as a week killer to protect its fungi gardens that feed the colony from bacteria and fungal infections, much as humans use multi-drug therapies to fight disease.

| September 2, 2010

Scientists in England have discovered that the leaf cutter ant uses multiple antibiotic-creating bacteria as a week killer to protect its fungi gardens that feed the colony from bacteria and fungal infections, much as humans use multi-drug therapies to fight disease.

The ants, Acromyrmex octospinosus, are native to the southern United States, South and Central America. The ants studied came from colonies in Trinidad and Tobago.

They are naturally infected with actinomycete bacteria that live on them in a mutual symbiosis. They then use antibiotics produced by these bacteria as part of a 'pesticide regime' in colonies and their carefully-tended fungus gardens, to keep down unwanted growths of other fungi and bacteria.

The research was led by Matt Hutchings at the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom. It was published in the journal BMC Biology.


 

Top news

Terminix-Triad Adopts New Approach to Employee Recruitment

The company is using social media to attract potential employees and working with community colleges to raise awareness of pest control as a possible career path for students.

FMC Corporation to Acquire Cheminova

FMC Corporation announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Cheminova A/S, a wholly owned subsidiary of Auriga Industries A/S

Patented Portable Heat Injector System

The new heating system was created with significant input from pest control companies.

Police Investigate Death of Jill Su, Wife of Dr. Nan-Yao Su

Davie, Fla. police have ruled the death of 59-year-old Jill Su a homicide, multiple news outlets report. Jill Su is the wife of noted University of Florida Entomology Professor Dr. Nan-Yao Su.

Climate, Genetics Can Affect How Long Virus-Carrying Mosquitoes Live

The longer a mosquito lives, the better its odds of transmitting disease to humans or animals, according to new research from the University of Florida.